Clarence Troutman survived a two-month hospital stay with COVID-19, then went home in early June. But he’s far from over the disease, still suffering from limited endurance, shortness of breath and hands that can be stiff and swollen.

“Before COVID, I was a 59-year-old, relatively healthy man,” said the broadband technician from Denver. “If I had to say where I’m at now, I’d say about 50% of where I was, but when I first went home, I was at 20%.”

He credits much of his progress to the “motivation and education” gleaned from a new program for post-COVID patients at the University of Colorado, one of a small but growing number of clinics aimed at treating and studying those who have had the unpredictable coronavirus.

As the election nears, much attention is focused on daily infection numbers or the climbing death toll, but another measure matters: Patients who survive but continue to wrestle with a range of physical or mental effects, including lung damage, heart or neurological concerns, anxiety

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A member of a ground crew walks past American Airlines planes parked at the gate during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak at Ronald Reagan National Airport in Washington, U.S., April 5, 2020.

Joshua Roberts | Reuters

The Treasury Department on Tuesday said airlines could receive larger federal loans than previously expected after some carriers opted out, freeing up more funds in the program.

Congress in March approved $25 billion in federal loans for U.S. passenger airlines to help them weather the coronavirus pandemic, which has kept air travel demand at roughly 30% of last year’s levels.

Despite preliminary agreements, Southwest Airlines and Delta Air Lines have said they ultimately don’t plan to pursue the loans, thanks to other sources of financing. Delta, for example, earlier this month said it was able to upsize a debt sale backed by its SkyMiles frequent flyer program to $9 billion from the $6.5 billion it planned.

Airlines have until Wednesday to decide whether to take the federal loans.

Seven airlines —  Alaska, American, Frontier, JetBlue, Hawaiian, SkyWest and United are planning to take the loans, the Treasury Department said.

American last week said it secured $5.5 billion from the

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Coronavirus: Medical historian compares today’s outbreak to the 1918 flu pandemic

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STERLING, Colo. — Tonja Jimenez is far from the only person driving an RV down Colorado’s rural highways. But unlike the other rigs, her 34-foot-long motor home is equipped as an addiction treatment clinic on wheels, bringing lifesaving treatment to the northeastern corner of the state, where patients with substance use disorders are often left to fend for themselves.

As in many states, access to addiction treatment remains a challenge in Colorado, so a new state program has transformed six RVs into mobile clinics to reach isolated farming communities and remote mountain hamlets. And, in recent months, they’ve become more crucial: During the coronavirus pandemic, even as brick-and-mortar addiction clinics have closed or stopped taking new patients, these six-wheeled clinics have kept going, except for a pit stop this summer for air conditioning repair.

Their health teams perform in-person testing and counseling. And as broadband access isn’t always a given in these rural spots, the RVs also provide a telehealth bridge to the medical providers back in the big cities. Working from afar, these providers can prescribe medicine to fight addiction and the ever-present risk of overdose, an especially looming concern amid the isolation and stress of the pandemic.

Mobile

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Pelosi believes coronavirus stimulus deal still possible